Native art

How do we learn to do these things? by Kim Shuck, June Artist-in-Residence

After questions about my background, my religion and alternately about my inspiration and vision, the most commonly asked question I've had in the gallery so far is 'How did you learn to do this stuff?' I'm sure that other Native artists have other answers to that question but here is a bit of an answer for me. I use a number of different beading techniques in my work. In order of most to least common as of this week: bead applique, flat peyote stitch, flat round peyote stitch, cheyenne brick stitch and loomed beading. Now to take them utterly out of order...

Colors in Beading by Kim Shuck, June Artist-in-Residence

Someone asked me today where I got my beads. I have two stores I like to order from online. I have one place I like to go and poke through.  I have a serious bead collection myself. When community members see me bead they often donate things they think I'll like. Finally, I am  often given collections of beads from people who have passed. None of this helps the fact that seed beads come in certain colors and not really others. Glass is a picky substance.

June Artists in Residence complete one week in the Kimball Education Gallery

June 6—Quiet Sunday

It would likely be a mistake to judge the relative activity of Sundays in the gallery by the example of just the one. Today was, however, quite slow in terms of visitors.  Right up to the very last half hour we had only a few folk come and visit. This gives me the chance to mention the musicians who came by yesterday and yet somehow didn't get written about (I have an undeniably whimsical way of looking at a day and apologize to natoyiniinastumiik and Ed Dang). Yesterday's visitors provided some wonderful music and enhanced the gallery experience quite a bit. This month's performances have been/will be more along the lines of sharing than formal performing, with the exception of the final Friday. Anyway, the musicians were well received and certainly made me happy. They will be back on the third Saturday for those who  
missed them.

June Artist in Residence Kim Shuck shares her experience in the Kimball Education Gallery

June 4—A second foop

A few years ago I was given a set of meditation bells in a rosewood box. You were meant to tip the box over and some number of ball bearings inside would adhere to these sticky disks on the top of the box. Then when you flipped it back over the balls would gradually fall in varying patterns of sound. The reality was that you'd get the balls stuck and flip the box and about half of the balls would fall in one foop (foop here meaning flurry) then some time later another foop and  so forth. I have not tipped that box in over a year but there are still some hold out bearings that every so often release and sound a  bell. That happened this morning. I also got damp basement that had to be dried immediately. Today was pretty interesting, even before I got to the museum. I suppose that everything informs the work eh? So we had a massive foop on tuesday moving in, now we've had another foop. I imagine that at this point the balls fall more slowly.

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