Florence Gould Theater

AAC Lecture: "Oral Poetry and Aural Patterns: On Zoroaster’s Poetry and Religion", by Martin Schwartz

Legion of Honor museum
November 15, 2014 - 2:00pm

Martin Schwartz, professor emeritus of Iranian Studies, Department of Near Eastern Studies, University of California, Berkeley

The poetry of Zoroaster, among the oldest and the most elaborate of Indo-European literature, was orally composed and for centuries orally transmitted until it was committed to writing. It contains fascinating parallels with visual phenomena (including mandala-like structures), some of which are of interest for the study of cognition, and also encodes intricate representations of Zoroaster’s unique theology.

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Guest Lecture: "Houghton Hall: Portrait of an English Country House", by Christine Gervais

Exterior view of Houghton Hall
October 18, 2014 - 3:00pm

Houghton Hall was built in the Palladian style by England’s first prime minister, Sir Robert Walpole, in the early 1700s and is the family estate of the marquesses of Cholmondeley. Walpole’s collection of Old Master paintings was famously sold by his grandson to Catherine the Great in 1779, but the house and all of its furnishings remained almost wholly intact, and Walpole’s descendants have added considerably to the collection.

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Docent Lecture: "Elegant Excess: A Diary of 18th-Century Paris", by Marsha Holm

Salon Doré from the Hôtel de la Trémoille, Paris, ca. 1781
November 22, 2014 - 1:00pm2:00pm

From the salon to the shops, the couturier's to the courtiers, 18th-century Paris was all about high fashion and high living. Using paintings, furniture, porcelain, and silver from the collection of the Legion of Honor, this lecture will examine the food, fashion, and frivolities that made life in Paris so remarkable.

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Docent Lecture: "Houghton Hall: Portrait of an English Country House", by Jim Kohn

Houghton Hall
November 22, 2014 - 2:15pm3:15pm

Old-master paintings, sculptures, and decorative arts from the collection of the Marquess of Cholmondeley travel for the first time from one of England's greatest country estates. Houghton Hall was built in the early 1700s by Sir Robert Walpole, considered England's first prime minister and an ancestor of the current marquess. From portraits by William Hogarth, Sir Joshua Reynolds, and John Singer Sargent to exquisite examples of Sèvres porcelain, rare pieces of R. J. & S.

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Docent Lecture: "Houghton Hall: Portrait of an English Country House", by Alfred Escoffier

Exterior view of Houghton Hall
November 9, 2014 - 1:00pm2:00pm

Old-master paintings, sculptures, and decorative arts from the collection of the Marquess of Cholmondeley travel for the first time from one of England's greatest country estates. Houghton Hall was built in the early 1700s by Sir Robert Walpole, considered England's first prime minister and an ancestor of the current marquess. From portraits by William Hogarth, Sir Joshua Reynolds, and John Singer Sargent to exquisite examples of Sèvres porcelain, rare pieces of R. J. & S.

This event is expired.

Docent Lecture: "Houghton Hall: Portrait of an English Country House", by Marsha Holm

Houghton Hall
November 4, 2014 - 1:00pm2:00pm

Old-master paintings, sculptures, and decorative arts from the collection of the Marquess of Cholmondeley travel for the first time from one of England's greatest country estates. Houghton Hall was built in the early 1700s by Sir Robert Walpole, considered England's first prime minister and an ancestor of the current marquess. From portraits by William Hogarth, Sir Joshua Reynolds, and John Singer Sargent to exquisite examples of Sèvres porcelain, rare pieces of R. J. & S.

This event is expired.

Film Screening: "Mona Lisa Is Missing"

Mona Lisa is Missing film poster
September 27, 2014 - 2:00pm

On August 21, 1911, the Mona Lisa disappeared from her place on the wall in the Salon Carré in the Louvre. Even more surprising, this famous work of art remained missing for ​nearly two and a half years.​ It was one of the biggest news stories of its day, making headlines around the world. French police were completely baffled, and as time passed, Parisians resigned themselves to never seeing Leonardo's masterpiece again—even though the Mona Lisa and her kidnapper were hiding under their very noses.

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