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John Baldessari: A Print Retrospective from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation

July 11, 2009November 8, 2009
John Baldessari began making prints in the mid-1970s and has continued to produce editions through the years with publishers such as Brooke Alexander Editions, Cirrus Editions, Gemini G.E.L., and Crown Point Press. This retrospective of prints is organized by the Fine Arts Museums from the Portland, Oregon-based collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer, which has among its vast print holdings a complete archive of Baldessari’s printed work.
John Baldessari: A Print Retrospective from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation is organized by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco and the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation. Education programs presented in conjunction with this exhibition are generously underwritten by the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation. The exhibition complements the publication of The Prints of John Baldessari: A Catalogue Raisonne 1971–2007 by Sharon Coplan Hurowitz and Wendy Weitman (Hudson Hills Press LLC, October 2009), and the exhibition John Baldessari: Pure Beauty opening at the Tate Modern in October 2009.

Paris sans fin: Alberto Giacometti’s Paris

The Logan Gallery of Illustrated Books
March 27, 2010September 5, 2010

Best known for his achievements in sculpture and painting, Alberto Giacometti (1901–1966) was also an accomplished printmaker. In 1957 he began an epic series of 150 lithographs of his beloved Paris, where he had lived since 1922. The lithographs were intended for a deluxe artist’s book Paris sans fin (Paris Forever) that would be published by Tériade, one of the great innovators of the artist book in the modern era.

Paris sans fin
Alberto Giacometti, Untitled (Man at Café Table), plate 90 in the book Paris sans fin. 2000.200.50.91

Annual Giving

Contact Information

Emily Christian, Associate Director of Donor and Member Programs

Alexandra Higgins
Annual Giving Coordinator

One of the Museums’ most vital sources of support is our Annual Giving program. This program brings together a dynamic group of individual donors who are passionate about art and dedicated to ensuring that diverse communities have access to our exhibitions and programs throughout the year. These generous individuals are, in turn, enriched by the impact of their contributions on those whose horizons are broadened by their museum experiences.

Annual Giving donors enjoy a host of attractive benefits, including invitations to exclusive events, private tours, and VIP tickets.

Planned Giving

Contact Information

Pam Earing
Associate Director of Individual Giving

The Fine Arts Museums have served our community for more than a century, and we are dedicated to fulfilling our important mission for the benefit of generations to come. This commitment is supported each year by many thoughtful and forward-thinking individuals who give through their estates. Estate planning offers donors the opportunity to transform a love of art into a lasting cultural legacy for the Museums and for the community.

Japanesque: The Japanese Print in the Era of Impressionism

October 16, 2010January 9, 2011

The Japanese Print in the Era of Impressionism introduces audiences to the development of the Japanese print over two centuries (1700–1900) and reveals its profound influence on Western art during the era of Impressionism. This exhibition complements the de Young Museum’s presentations of paintings from the Musée d'Orsay, many of which are aesthetically indebted to concepts of Japanese art.

Left: Hiroshige, Gion Shrine in the Snow (Gionsha setchu), from the series Famous Places in Kyoto (Kyoto meisho no uchi), ca. 1833–1834. Right: Henri Riviere, La Tour en construction, vue de Trocadero, pl. 3 from the book Les Trente-Six Vues de la Tour Eiffel, 1902. Color lithograph © 2010 ARS, New York / ADAGP, Paris

Impressionist Paris: City of Light

June 5, 2010September 26, 2010

La ville lumière—“the City of Light”: Paris earned this nickname during the 19th century with the proliferation of gas lamps that lit up the French capital, turning night into day and boosting its economic vitality. Moreover, the radiance of the metropolis transcended the glow of its streetlights as Paris ascended to its role as the cultural capital of Europe. Authors, composers, and especially visual artists—painters, sculptors, printmakers, and photographers—thrived in this dazzling setting.


Presenting Sponsor
Bank of the West

Lead Sponsor
Boucheron - Paris

Additional support provided by GOODBYES.

Impressionist Paris: City of Light
Left: Georges Seurat (1859–1891) Eiffel Tower, ca. 1889. Oil on panel. Center: Edgar Degas (1834–1917), Mary Cassatt at the Louvre: The Etruscan Gallery, 1879–1880. Aquatint, drypoint, soft-ground etching, and etching with burnishing. Right: Charles Marville (1816–1879), Street Lamp, 8 Place de l'Opera, ca. 1870–1879. Albumen silver print from wet-collodion-on-glass negative

Kenneth Patchen: Painted Books and Picture-Poems

November 21, 2009March 21, 2010

Already an established writer known for his pacifist sympathies and the 1941 anti-war novel Journal of Albion Moonlight, Kenneth Patchen (1911–1972) and his wife, Miriam, settled in the Telegraph Hill neighborhood of San Francisco in 1950. They became friendly with Lawrence Ferlinghetti, founder of the City Lights publishing company and bookstore and Patchen became a contributor to Ferlinghetti’s Pocket Poets series.

The Little Bug Angel from A Surprise for the Bagpipe Player, 1955.

Very Postmortem: Mummies and Medicine

October 31, 2009October 31, 2010

Very Postmortem: Mummies and Medicine explores the modern scientific examination of mummies providing new insights into the conditions under which the Egyptians lived, bringing us closer to understanding who they were. The exhibition is a homecoming celebration marking the return of Irethorrou, the Fine Arts Museums’ mummy who has been on loan since 1944. CT-scans done by scientists at Stanford Medical School shed light on Irethorrou’s physical attributes and cause of death. The scans provide depth and scientific background to the exhibition and contribute to a three-dimensional “fly through” of the mummy and a forensic reconstruction of his head.

Very Postmortem: Mummies and Medicine
Left: Coffin and mummy of Irethorrou. Right: Visualization of Irethorrou showing two amulets on his forehead by Sarah Hegmann of eHuman, Inc. using Osirix software

Cartier and America

Extended through May 9, 2010!
December 19, 2009May 9, 2010

Cartier came to fame as the “King of Jewelers” during the Belle Époque for his beautifully made diamond and platinum jewelry created for the courts of Europe and Americans of the Gilded Age. With an extensive variety of jewelry forms—ranging from traditional white diamond suites to the highly colored exotic creations of the 1920s and 1930s—Cartier made its mark with the ingenuity of its designs and its exquisite craftsmanship. Cartier and America celebrates the imagination and creativity of Cartier in the 20th century. The jewelry and works of art include pieces from the private collection of Cartier.



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