The de Young and Legion of Honor are open. Learn about extra precautions to welcome you back.

John Baldessari: A Print Retrospective from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation

July 11, 2009November 8, 2009
John Baldessari began making prints in the mid-1970s and has continued to produce editions through the years with publishers such as Brooke Alexander Editions, Cirrus Editions, Gemini G.E.L., and Crown Point Press. This retrospective of prints is organized by the Fine Arts Museums from the Portland, Oregon-based collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer, which has among its vast print holdings a complete archive of Baldessari’s printed work.
Location: 

Sponsors

John Baldessari: A Print Retrospective from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation is organized by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco and the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation. Education programs presented in conjunction with this exhibition are generously underwritten by the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation. The exhibition complements the publication of The Prints of John Baldessari: A Catalogue Raisonne 1971–2007 by Sharon Coplan Hurowitz and Wendy Weitman (Hudson Hills Press LLC, October 2009), and the exhibition John Baldessari: Pure Beauty opening at the Tate Modern in October 2009.

Paris sans fin: Alberto Giacometti’s Paris

The Logan Gallery of Illustrated Books
March 27, 2010September 6, 2010

Best known for his achievements in sculpture and painting, Alberto Giacometti (1901–1966) was also an accomplished printmaker. In 1957 he began an epic series of 150 lithographs of his beloved Paris, where he had lived since 1922. The lithographs were intended for a deluxe artist’s book Paris sans fin (Paris Forever) that would be published by Tériade, one of the great innovators of the artist book in the modern era.

Location: 
Paris sans fin
Alberto Giacometti, Untitled (Man at Café Table), plate 90 in the book Paris sans fin. 2000.200.50.91

Volunteer

Welcome to the information page for the Fine Arts Museums’ Volunteer Council! Here, you’ll find information about volunteering for the de Young and Legion of Honor including an overview of our various volunteer opportunities, benefits offered, frequently asked questions, and how to get involved.

Individual Giving

Contact Information

Pam Earing
Director of Individual Giving
415.750.8940
pearing@famsf.org

Larissa Trociuk, Individual Giving Officer
415.750.3641
ltrociuk@famsf.org

Major gifts of support have a significant impact on the Museum’s ability to present new exhibitions, offer the highest-quality of educational programming, and engage audiences in interactive experiences with art.   They enable the conservation of FAMSF’s collections, and inspire capital projects which support asset-building needs.  Major gifts come in many forms and can be made through cash contributions, gifts of appreciated securities, bequests and planned gifts, or in-kind gifts such as contributions of valuable art.

Business Council

What kind of impact does your company want to have in the community? What kind of cultural engagement opportunities do you envision for your employees?

Membership in the Business Council engages businesses of all sizes and from a wide variety of industries in the cultural life of our community and demonstrates a company's commitment to the arts.

Legacy Giving

Locally rooted and internationally engaged, the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco strive to connect visitors with local and global art to illuminate the past, speak of the present, and shape the future. Through a legacy gift, you can join other passionate supporters in ensuring access to the Museums’ collections, exhibitions, and education programs for visitors of all ages and backgrounds for generations to come.

Japanesque: The Japanese Print in the Era of Impressionism

October 16, 2010January 9, 2011

The Japanese Print in the Era of Impressionism introduces audiences to the development of the Japanese print over two centuries (1700–1900) and reveals its profound influence on Western art during the era of Impressionism. This exhibition complements the de Young Museum’s presentations of paintings from the Musée d'Orsay, many of which are aesthetically indebted to concepts of Japanese art.

Location: 
Left: Hiroshige, Gion Shrine in the Snow (Gionsha setchu), from the series Famous Places in Kyoto (Kyoto meisho no uchi), ca. 1833–1834. Right: Henri Riviere, La Tour en construction, vue de Trocadero, pl. 3 from the book Les Trente-Six Vues de la Tour Eiffel, 1902. Color lithograph © 2010 ARS, New York / ADAGP, Paris

Pages

Subscribe to Front page feed