Masks are required for all visitors regardless of vaccination status. Read our safety guidelines.

Make Your Voice Heard

Voting at the Legion of Honor

We’re proud to serve as a polling site. If the Legion of Honor is your polling location, we welcome you! For all other San Francisco residents eligible to vote, locate your polling site. The Legion of Honor Cafe will be open for in-person voting and vote-by-mail ballot drop-off from 7 am to 8 pm on Election Day, Tuesday, November 3.

Legion Of Honor Cafe
100 34th Avenue
Enter off El Camino Del Mar at Legion of Honor Drive.

Interested in visiting the museum before or after voting?

We will require timed tickets for every visitor, including general admission. To ensure your preferred time slot, please reserve your entry date and time in advance online.

All tickets are timed for entry to allow for a comfortable and uncrowded gallery experience. Capacity has been reduced to 25 percent of overall building capacity for your safety. For assistance in booking, members should call 800.777.9996 and non-members should call 888.901.6645.

Visitors with a general admission ticket must enter the building within 90 minutes of the time indicated on their ticket—entrance will not be permitted earlier than 90 minutes before or more than 90 minutes after the indicated time.

Related Works from Our Collection

Shahn's poster image is based on his painting Hunger (1946). It was used by the CIO (Congress of Industrial Organizations) for a voter registration drive in the aftermath of World War II, which left thousands of European children hungry. The poster was displayed in union halls across the country in the lead up to the mid-term elections of 1946.

Ben Shahn, We Want Peace, Register to Vote, 1946. Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, 2006.24.46.4. © Estate of Ben Shahn / Licensed by ARS / VAGA, New York, NY
Ben Shahn, "We Want Peace, Register to Vote," 1946. Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, 2006.24.46.4. © Estate of Ben Shahn / Licensed by ARS / VAGA, New York, NY

"Ballots not Bullets" is the slogan imprinted on the ballot box in which Americans, represented by a Black man and white woman, among others, place their votes.They are surrounded by symbols of America (a bemused Uncle Sam, an eagle) and the political process (an elephant, a donkey), as well as the emblem of ancient Rome SPQR (Senatus Populusque Romanus, or The Senate and the Roman people) a reference to government determined by the people.

James Henry Daugherty, "Ballots not Bullets," 20th century. 10 3/8 x 13 1/2 in. (26.4 x 34.2 cm). Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Gift of the artist, 1954.147.13
James Henry Daugherty, "Ballots not Bullets," 20th century. 10 3/8 x 13 1/2 in. (26.4 x 34.2 cm). Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Gift of the artist, 1954.147.13